Tag Archives: orange

Of record.

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Photography by Sam Armocido

Photography by Sam Armocido

Five or six years ago, my parents’ newspaper changed, and not for the better. The wonderful, large pages got smaller, and the bylines all read AP. Now, the Associated Press is an important news source, and do a much better job at covering Washington politics and major events around the country then the small writing staff in Springfield, MA, but I miss garden writers gardening in the same weather and soil that I am and reporters intimately knowledgeable of local politics.

The local Gazette and Penny Saver, still employing staff to cover local politics, sports, business and schools, have become local publications of record. While DC’s local paper is a national paper of record, we are also blessed with smaller papers employing writers who are embedded in our city. They cover the issues that impact our neighborhoods and the people who make them special.

Last week, we had the opportunity to host a writer from DC’s Hill Rag at #testkitchen. She joined us as we refined a recipe I had presented at an American University health and wellness event the day before. Annette joined right in helping to taste recipes and suggest ingredients and, as always, many palates make a stronger dish. Look for Annette’s write up in the May issue of the Hill Rag. In the meantime, enjoy this salad, and many thanks to the students, faculty and staff at AU for tasting it last Wednesday afternoon.

Lemongrass Fennel Orange Salad

For dressing:

  • 1 shallot, minced
  • 1/3 cup Lemongrass or other light, sweet vinegar*
  • 1 tbs honey
  • 2/3 cup Avocado or other neutral flavored oil*

*This is another chance to shop online or in person at Sapore Oil and vinegar. A strong olive oil will overpower these ingredients, so use something neutral like avocado, grapeseed or vegetable oil. For a vinegar, use something light and sweet. Unseasoned rice wine vinegar is easily available. This is also a good opportunity to break out the gift bottle of Pear Chardonnay or other fruit-wine vinegar that’s aging in your pantry.

For salad:

  • 1 head fennel, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 cup dried cherries or cranberries
  • 2 heads butter lettuce, gently chopped in pieces*
  • 1 orange, peeled and sectioned, sliced or chopped

*My big meathooks rough up easily bruised butter lettuce, so I chop mine gently.

Photography by Sam Armocido

Photography by Sam Armocido

Directions:

  • Make dressing. Whisk together shallot, vinegar and honey with a pinch each of salt and pepper.
  • Whisk in oil in a thin stream to form a creamy emulsion.
  • Toss together fennel, orange and cherries. Lightly dress with 1/4 cup dressing.
  • Lightly dress lettuce with 1/4 cup dressing.
  • Plate lettuce, topped with fennel mixture.
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Pork is the answer.

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My husband Jason and my brother Alec are allies. Each the youngest of three, they speak a common language, one I’m not too sure I approve of. In addition to their inability to find humor in the harmless practical jokes I may have played on Alec when we were kids (maple syrup in the water bottle we used to comb our hair, for instance), they also prefer the canned, gelatinous abomination known as cranberry sauce over fresh, whole fruit.

I’m in no way a purest. My Aunt Ali’s cranberry, walnut mold is the sentimental favorite, but the foodie, hipster compotes I’ve been cooking down since my mid-twenties deliver equal satisfaction. Still, despite my best efforts, because of Jason and Alec, I am forced to open one solitary can in an otherwise farm fresh meal preparation. Until this year.

If there is one way to win over men with food, it’s a really fatty piece of pork. I promise, one mention of pork belly, and your father, brothers and uncles will gladly turn off the game and come running to the dining room table.

Pork belly took me a couple tries to get right. A lot of fat will render out, so don’t rush the initial searing. There are a couple inches at the end of the piece of pork belly that are almost entirely fat. Save those for later. Finally, when you sear the meat before serving, pat it dry and cook it over relatively low heat to prevent the fat and sugars from burning.

Braised in cranberry apple cider, the pork is flavorful and tender. Tart-sweet, orange-infused cranberry is the perfect foil for rich, fatty pork. This round goes to me. Now if I could only get them to eat beets…

Cider Braised Pork Belly

*Begin the pork two days ahead of time, letting it dry marinate overnight and braise for several hours the following day.

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 – 2 pounds pork belly
  • 1 tbs coarse salt
  • 2 tbs Spanish paprika
  • 1 tbs ground Aleppo pepper (or 1 tsp cayenne)
  • 1 tbs fresh-cracked black pepper
  • 2 large shallots, minced
  • 2 tbs red miso paste
  • 2 cups cranberry-apple cider (or 1 cup apple cider and 1 cup cranberry juice)
  • 1/2 cup sherry
  • 1/4 cup Autumn Apple Vinegar*
  • 2 tbs maple sugar
  • 1/2 tsp whole peppercorns

*My seasonal favorite from Sapore Oil and Vinegar. You could substitute sherry vinegar.

Directions:

  • Mix together salt, Spanish paprika, hot pepper and black pepper. Rub pork belly with rub and refrigerate overnight, up to 24 hours.
  • Warm a dutch oven over medium heat. Meanwhile rinse dry rub from pork belly and pat dry. Cut pork belly, the short way, into 1″ strips.
  • Sear pork belly on all sides, starting with the fat side down. The fat will produce some smoke so get ready to fan your alarm.
  • Pour off all but 2 tbs fat and sauté shallots until soft. Add miso and cook 1 minute longer. Add cider, sherry and vinegar to pan. Bring to a boil. Add pork belly, cover and simmer over low heat for 2.5 – 5 hours, until fork tender.*
  • Remove meat from braising liquid, pat dry. (Move onto next recipe or see the next step to serve separately.)
  • To serve the pork belly on its own, slice in serving size piece, and sauté over medium heat for 1 minute a side before serving. Be careful not to burn the fat.

*Braising the meat longer makes it more tender, but it was delicious at 2.5 hours. You can also braise it in the over at 200 degrees for 4-5 hours.

Cranberry Compote With Pork Belly

Ingredients:

  • 1 tbs butter
  • 1 shallot, minced
  • 1 star anise
  • 3 cups fresh, whole cranberries
  • 1 cup maple or brown sugar
  • 1/2 cups apple cider
  • 1/4 cup ruby Port
  • 1 tbs Orange Oil*
  • 1 1/2 pounds Cider Braised Pork Belly (recipe above)
  • 1 tbs Autumn Apple Vinegar

*You can substitute Sapore’s Orange infused oil with two 2″ pieces of orange zest.

Directions:

  • Melt butter in a 3 qt sauce pan over medium heat.
  • Add shallot and sauté until soft., 3-5 minutes. Add star anise and cranberries and sauté for 3 minutes longer.
  • Add sugar, cider, Port and orange oil. Turn heat to medium-high and cook until liquid reduces to a thick, jammy glaze.
  • Slice pork belly into 1/2” strips. Sauté over medium low heat for 1-2 minutes a side being careful not to burn the fat. Add Autumn Apple Vinegar and reduce, turning pork belly to coat.
  • Serve pork belly pieces over the compote.

Crécy is not French for “carrot.”

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Anything this orange, made with root vegetables, should be served on a crisp fall day – rich and hearty with a crusty bread and some good farm-fresh butter (which I evangelize about here). But this carrot-beet soup is light and fresh, tastes as good cold as it does served hot and is perfect for summer.

Arriving home from a trip to the Market with baby carrots and golden beets, I began searching cookbooks for salads and sautés. Stumbling across a recipe for Potage Crécy first made me think of soup. Crécy, it turns out, is not French for orange root vegetables, but refers to a town known, once-upon-a-time, for growing exceptional carrots. However, there is debate about which of two French towns, one in the south and one in the north, each with Crécy in its name, first served up this light summer soup.

Reading through several recipes, I discovered a basic formula of carrots cooked with onions and stock, puréed and flavored with orange. We added the golden beets, sweet but far less earthy than red ones. I grabbed a bottle of Sapore’s Orange Oil off the shelf and we served up three bowls, each seasoned differently. It was a quick bite after adding turmeric but before adding cumin that was our favorite – although curry was a close second. Served warm, it is light and sweet. Once chilled it is herbal and far more carrot-y. Both are delicious.

Potage Crécy

Ingredients:

  • 2 tbs butter
  • 1 candy sweet onion, or white onion, diced
  • 4 cups thinly sliced carrots
  • 3 cups diced golden beets
  • 1 tbs minced garlic
  • 6-8 cups vegetable stock
  • 3 tbs Orange Oil*
  • 1/2 tsp Turmeric
  • 1/3 cup cream
  • Sherry vinegar

*If you don’t have Orange Oil, substitute 3 tbs olive oil, and one tablespoon grated orange zest

Directions:

  • Melt butter over medium heat in a 4 quart soup pot. Sauté onions until
  • soft and translucent.
  • Add carrots and beets. Sauté 7-10 minutes until golden on edges. Add ginger after 5 minutes.
  • Add stock and simmer approximately 30 minutes until vegetables can be mashed with a fork.
  • Pass soup through the finest blade of a food mill or purée with a blender. Return to pot.
  • Stir in Orange Oil and simmer an additional 5 minutes to bring flavors together.
  • Remove from heat, let cool slightly, and stir through cream.
  • Add turmeric a little at a time so as to not overpower the carrot flavor.
  • Season to taste with salt, pepper and sherry vinegar.
  • Serve hot or cold.